How Microsoft made the Windows 10 Desktop Photograph

Bliss is widely accepted to be the most ubiquitous photograph to have ever graced our computer screens, simply because it was the flagship desktop wall paper that came with Windows XP. The image itself was a wonderfully evocative scene that inspired many interpretations, parodies and is still discussed academically today. One of the most common misconceptions is that it was CGI, or at best a very heavily edited photograph, however as the man who took the snapshot, Chuck O’Rear explained, it was little more than a medium format frame of some vineyards on film that Bill Gates bought the full rights to.

For Windows 10, we’re treated to this:

1312962177842854503

A highly stylised, light show that looks like a scene straight out of Tron Legacy. It’s a sanitised, far too perfect, completely constructed image that is as far away from Bliss as you can get. Despite still championing a photographer to produce the piece, the web is less than impressed.

Microsoft have gone to great lengths to explain what they call their “iconic” new desktop wallpaper by putting together a short video. The process of taking the photograph included lasers, smoke machines, ‘ice-crystals?’ and even camera mapping. From what we can gather the image which can be seen in-situ below is a still from a movie camera.

The fact that a company as big as Microsoft is still using real people to create stunning works of art is something to be pleased about itself, but the feeling you’re left with after watching the promo video is ‘how much money did they actually waste making this?‘ It just seems to go a bit over the top, and then some.

At least they didn’t just badly Photoshop our neighbouring galaxy, huh?

1312962177686011751

We look forward to seeing what other images are included in the Windows 10 package, and indeed if this one displayed moves.

And just for old time’s sake, here’s Chuck and his photograph Bliss. Aww we love you, man!

World Most famous photo by Chuck O'rear


via Gizmodo via The Verge

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s