Inspired: The Photographer’s Playbook

Winter is coming, inspiration is waining, cameras are getting used less, photographers are losing their way. At Phogotraphy we’ve discovered a wonderful little book by Jason Fulford and Gregory Halpern that aims to combat that lack of confidence by tasking readers with small non-laborious tasks, often whimsical in nature. The Photographer’s Playbook.

The pair courted 307 people who’d touched their lives in some way and had in turn dedicated much of their own to photography. Anna Fox, Continue reading

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The Making of Alex Timmermans’ Stunning ‘Swan Lake’

It’s a cry photographers know all to well, “the final shot of the day was the one, I’d finally cracked it” and that rings true for Alex Timmermans’ most recent wet plate collodion creation ‘Swan Lake’. A man who strives in meeting a bar of perfection set so high he’s known to keep working on a set until sheer beauty is realised. Just take a look at the final plate.
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Swan Lake by Alex Timmermans, 2015

What is so striking about this image alters depending on your perspective. Initially, the swan, which we know as a beautiful but fierce creature is mid-dynamic, calling upon a dancer somehow floating on water in a self embrace. The stage looks incredibly dangerous however Continue reading

Now a Computer Algorithm turns your Photographs into Poetry

This morning I stumbled on to the wonderfully engineered Word.Camera website via a PetaPixel blog post. The premise is simple: Convert a jpeg into somewhat meaningful English language.

To test it out I uploaded this small jpeg of my son on top of an abandoned building, silhouetted by the Sun.

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I gave the computer an unusual image with plenty of contrast to decipher.

It took the algorithm a few minutes to process an answer. Finally I was presented with several paragraphs of text giving a better than vague description of the image it received:

Of course, a barbed wire, a men, and an energy. Thus, the barbed wire remains unknown. The men evokes typing, and the energy is made from an enterprising or ambitious drive. Probably, the barbed wire remains unknown.

…Yet, a silhouette and a sunset: the silhouette evokes outlining, and the sunset is not the time in the evening at which the sun beginning to fall below the horizon.

Ok, it’s a little jumbled, but understandable English for anyone who has at least a slim grasp on the language. The prose has a familiar air of poetry about it and perhaps with a little human refinement could even be passed off as professional.

I spoke to David Phillips, who operated a poem a day blog in 2014 to ask his thoughts on how the computer algorithm could shake up the industry. Continue reading