Be Mesmerised by this Beautiful Slit Scan Music Video

Music videos can be a hive of experimental photography. Often a director will take an idea they’ve seen and put it into practise to produce surreal often breathtaking results using unorthodox camera techniques.

Richie Johnston is one such filmmaker that demonstrates how subverting a traditional photographic process called slit scan photography can be used to create mesmerising visuals for the musician’s audience.

The film was made to coincide with the Just Music’s Ambient Zone 2 compilation and clocks in at almost an hour in length.

Throughout the performance ballet dancer Rachel Bodger moves in a slow, rhythmic motion drawing on the obvious quirk of photography to elongate her body and draw patterns within the frame. The result is hard to turn away from. After a few minutes it’s clear that the dancer’s improvisation is geared towards the photography used rather than the music, although it compliments it perfectly.

We compiled a few screenshots that show the different patterns Bodger and Johnston’s collaboration achieved and at Phogotraphy we truly think they are marvellous!

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If you’re interested in slit scan photography and want to try to do something similar in a project of your own, Richie Johnston put together a short ‘making of’ video to guide us through the thoughts and processes involved in the production. It’s well worth a look, maybe more so than even the highly polished film above.

Check it out:


 

Video and stills used with explicit permission of the Richie Johnston.

The Imperfections in Your Medium now will be Treasured when Superseded.

Cutting the imperfections from our final selection is something we as photographers are all familiar with. We’re used to striving for clean, crisp, tack sharp images that can only be bettered by the next model in line. There are some of us though that have begun to embrace those imperfections, even dare I suggest invoke them with the *groan* Instagram filters.

Some wise and sombre words from English musician Brian Eno on struggling to embrace the odd quirks in the current medium at the forefront of technology.

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Digital imaging technology is slowly pursuing that line of perfection. New models of cameras are now focussing on areas that only a few photographers require leaving errors either intentional or devastating. A ruined digital file can’t be repaired as easily as a faded print.

Off the top of our Phogotraphy heads the only obvious mainstream digital camera imperfection we can recall over recent years is the purple fringing on the iPhone 5. If you can think of any others that may one day be considered a unique feature, let us know in the comment section or via social media.

The Faces Behind the Camera: Tin-type Photographers from the Great Depression Era

We spent some time today browsing the fabulous archives of the Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) and, as we have a love of all things photography, decided to share some images of tin-type street photographers as we’ve often see their results but rarely seen the faces behind their cameras.

Tin-type photographer at Morrisville, Vermont fair. Carl Mydans, August 1936.
Tin-type photographer at Morrisville, Vermont fair. Carl Mydans, August 1936.

It’s a fascinating insight into how the photographers Continue reading

Model makes an Incredible 11 Minute Pose for Pinhole Photography Video

You know in the debate of analogue vs digital, analogue photographers are always saying the whole process behind film photography slows them down and makes them think more? We found this wonderful pinhole photography video that perfectly represents this point:

Veneno Dulce (Sweet Poison) by Israel Caballero shows a model making an incredible 11 minute pose for his pinhole images and Continue reading

Look at How some Experts Thought Digital Images would be Sent in 1936

We discovered this wonderful book ‘Electronic Television’ by George H. Eckhardt earlier today and were thrilled to find this vision of future photography transmission inside it (it was written in 1936):

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While Eckhardt describes this method of transmitting an image impractical in order to demonstrate the superiority of television transmission, it is fascinating to Continue reading

Malfunctioning Scanner Creates Beautiful Glitch Art

Perfection is so 2007. Unless you’re still stuck in the ever turning escalator of commercialism you’ll have noticed these days imperfections are very much in vogue. So when ultra-hip blog ‘The Rescued Film Project’ started experiencing technical glitches with their scanner, it was like churning out instant art.

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In what looks like a malfunction capturing the higher end of the dynamic range in each scan, the near to over exposed objects have been replaced Continue reading

Stunning or Failures? We Chose 30 Imperfect Photographs from the Apollo Archive.

When NASA went to the Moon, digital cameras didn’t exist and therefore exposures of the Lunar landscape had to be caught on film. Recently a team tasked with the preservation of the Apollo mission films uploaded the entire collection of images to Flickr. Among the 2400+ images are a surprisingly large amount of failed frames consisting of light leaks, over exposures, sticky labels and motion blur. Despite being redundancies, they carry with them an abstract beauty and a feeling of realness. NASA didn’t send photographers to the Moon, they sent astronauts and the vernacular feel to the plethora of pictures they brought back works as a surprising twist to a journey that is drifting further into our past.

Phogotraphy spent some time picking through the archive and choosing the thirty best ‘Imperfect Apollo’ frames we could find to share with you. We hope you enjoy them as much as we did.

21036777064_ad2ff91e98_k Continue reading

Watch a Photographer Unveil Stunning Gumoil Portrait on Video

We’re always keen to share alternative photography processes here on PhoGoTraphy and when we saw this lovely video by Anna Ostanina we thought it would make perfect Sunday viewing!

We spoke with Anna about the Continue reading

Photographer Explodes Gunpowder onto Images to Create Wonderful ‘Works of Fire’

Every once in a while you come across a series of images that explode off the page with a beautiful simplicity and Christopher Colville’s photographs have quite literally done just that – because they’re created using gunpowder!

Christopher Colville's 'Works of Fire' series
Christopher Colville’s ‘Works of Fire’ series

Christopher Colville’s stunning ‘Works of Fire‘ series was created by artfully pouring gunpowder over a silver gelatin print and igniting them, with Continue reading