Introducing the Trump Snappy – A Vintage Camera Collector’s Great Find

Vintage camera collect Gregg Matthews caused a stir in the online community earlier today when he announced the latest model to join his grand collection, the ‘Trump Snappy.’

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Made in the USA and seemingly a relic from a former business venture, Matthews had a few choice words to say about the fantastic piece of plastic: Continue reading

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Santander Bank Advert Suggests Buying a Film Camera

One of the world’s largest banks has released an advert for a checking account suggesting to buy rolls of film with any savings made when signing up. We’re totally ok with that.

Spotted in the wild by #BelieveinFilm photographer KristenWithACamera the commercial by Santander Bank in the UK appears on the side of a Continue reading

Animation: A History of the Photo Camera

Here’s a short film you can watch during your break that takes a look at a dozen or so ground breaking ‘photo cameras’ that shook the world upon their release since 1900.

Uploaded by the creative people at Copilotos, the black and white animation skips through decades like they didn’t exist to concentrate on just a select few models leading up to the current camera of choice used today.

Can you guess what that is? Continue reading

Canon vs Nikon: The Definitive Crush Test

In the latest video in a long line of successful forced dismantling episodes, the current darling of the Youtube universe have done the unthinkable and crushed two vintage cameras. The reason? To finally answer that age old question of Canon vs Nikon superiority.

Watch the video below, or scroll down if you want to see the finished result.

This sort of thing can be difficult for camera enthusiasts to stomach, however unlike other similar camera destruction reviews we’ve covered before on Phogotraphy these guys were using non-functioning cameras and let’s face it, the chap controlling the press has an adorable accent.

So which brand ‘won’?

Continue reading

Lucidcam: Because Granny will Wear a Cardboard Box on her Head to see you in 3D

The latest in what’s becoming an increasingly dull line of products being pushed in the virtual reality headset market is named Lucidcam and apparently people are getting very excited about it. The premise is a nice one; targeting middle-American families allowing an experience not far different from Apple’s Facetime but supposedly in 3D as long as you wear a cardboard box on your head.

Take a look at the fundraising promo video:

One brief look at the market for VR devices and you’ll see why this attempt at crowdfunding is happening now and not later. The Oculus Rift, now famously part Continue reading

The Faces Behind the Camera: Tin-type Photographers from the Great Depression Era

We spent some time today browsing the fabulous archives of the Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) and, as we have a love of all things photography, decided to share some images of tin-type street photographers as we’ve often see their results but rarely seen the faces behind their cameras.

Tin-type photographer at Morrisville, Vermont fair. Carl Mydans, August 1936.
Tin-type photographer at Morrisville, Vermont fair. Carl Mydans, August 1936.

It’s a fascinating insight into how the photographers Continue reading

Photographer René Smets Builds a Fully Functioning Camera Lens out of Wood.

Having spent most of his life building things for other people, photographer Rene Smets of Lummen, Belgium now enjoys his retirement by designing and constructing unusual wooden cameras which he would then go on to use for wet plate collodion photography. On the 3rd of October René set himself a project for the winter; to build a camera lens made out of wood. He would then go on to spend an exorbitant amount of time over the next nine days bringing his idea to life.

Rene documented the process with photographs, but like all great makers, started with a self made design first of which he would follow throughout the process:

schets houten lens

This is how the lens would start its life. Two different pieces of Belgian wood that have been dried over a twenty year period. On the left is Buxus wood, Continue reading

Reviewing a Century Old Kodak Camera

Every single day we seem to be bombarded with reviews of the latest and greatest cameras. Mike Eckman is a vintage camera collector who likes to do just that but with a difference. The models he reviews are older than most of us! Grab yourself a cuppa and enjoy this extensive review of an old folding camera.

What is it?

This is a No.1 Autographic Special made by the Eastman Kodak company between 1915 and 1920.  While Kodak was not known as a maker of high end cameras with top of the line specs, this camera was the exception to that rule.  Costing upwards of $50 (over $1300 today), this camera had a state of the art shutter and lens, incorporated many firsts such as the first Kodak to use Bakelite plastic, and was one of the best cameras of its era.


Film Type:
 120 Rollfilm Continue reading

Camera Collector Sees Red – Bizarre Photographic Exhibition of ‘Tacky Red Cameras’

Last week during a cold February evening in the Borders of Scotland, the lights of a small photographic art gallery were turned on for the first time and a new exhibition was unveiled. The walls were devoid of landscapes, portraits and the traditional visual art you’d come to expect with photographers. Instead a large, garish print hung on the far wall, unmistakably red. A small sign to the left gave it the name ‘Tacky Red Cameras.’

Tacky Red Cameras, Photographic Print - Sam Cornwell 2015.
Tacky Red Cameras, Photographic Print – Sam Cornwell 2015.

We’ve got used to seeing camera collections in many different shapes and forms, especially ones with high price tags on eBay. What makes this collection different from all those is the overwhelming abundance of the colour red. Upon further inspection, The Becher-esque style grid is filled with 81 (9×9) individually coloured red cameras.

Tacky Red Cameras Photographic Print, 70x70", Dibond.
Tacky Red Cameras Photographic Print, 70×70″, Dibond.

Tacky Red Cameras is a five year long study into mass production practises of the 20th century and how we have continued to consume in the present and beyond. A seemingly unobvious collection of red cameras all of which are still in their purchased, second hand state take place in three forms; a sculpture, a photographic print and a 3D printed object. The past, present and future.

The large print fills the white wall it is homed on and is big enough for the viewer to get up close and personal to inspect the different models on display. The actual cameras in sculpture form are presented beautifully encased in clear tubes close to the print.

Tacky Red Cameras, Sculpture – Sam Cornwell 2015.

The trifecta is completed with a much smaller exhibit, also unashamedly red. Artist Sam Cornwell collaborated with French artist Quentin Orhant to print a red camera. Yes, print. Continue reading

Artists Brings old Cameras back to Life as Anthropormorphic Sculptures

In a twist that may inspire millions to reach for their attic cupboards and pull out boxes of old camera gear, Michael Vivona shows that film photography isn’t dead just yet by bringing analogue cameras back to life.

Michael Vivona Camera Statue or Johnny 5 is still alive?
Michael Vivona Camera Statue or Johnny 5 is still alive?

Michael openly admits that he isn’t a photographer, which is evident from the Instagram filtered display photos he’s taken for his art. However, what he lacks in compositional detail for the camera frame, he more than makes up for in his artistic ability as a sculptor. And it’s not just your typical Hollywood shape that’s appearing in his collection, there’s a penchant for dogs as well.

Woof woof, whirrr, click.
Woof woof, whirrr, click.

Drawn to items built and designed in the ‘Atomic Age’ Michael poured through local thrift stores looking for items when he stumbled across his first ‘camerabot.’ With a projector as a body, security cameras as feet and an old twin lens reflex 120 film camera lending itself as eyes, his first Wall-E or Johnny-5 type character was born. Continue reading