This Book … is a Camera!

December is almost upon us and being that time of year we thought we’d save you a “Gifts for Photographers” Google search with this incredibly cute photography book with a twist.

It’s a camera!

camera2.jpg

Designed by the brilliant Kelli Anderson, this wonderful little stocking filler would be a joy for child or adult alike. At a price of just $29 it’ll be hard to resist for Continue reading

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The Faces Behind the Camera: Tin-type Photographers from the Great Depression Era

We spent some time today browsing the fabulous archives of the Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) and, as we have a love of all things photography, decided to share some images of tin-type street photographers as we’ve often see their results but rarely seen the faces behind their cameras.

Tin-type photographer at Morrisville, Vermont fair. Carl Mydans, August 1936.
Tin-type photographer at Morrisville, Vermont fair. Carl Mydans, August 1936.

It’s a fascinating insight into how the photographers Continue reading

FLIR ONE: Take InfraRed, Heat sensitive Photos on your Phone

Introducing the hotly anticipated FLIR ONE for smartphones. A small adapter that plugs into your lightning connector (or alternative) to produce an Infra Red image. At just $249 in the US and £199 in the UK, you can now easily afford to experiment with non-visible wavelength light using your phone.

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HEY, MY SAUSAGES ARE COOKED, YAY.

FLIR, who’ve been making IR cameras for decades have only recently joined the smartphone accessory market, however they’re already making an impact. Continue reading

Camera Collector Sees Red – Bizarre Photographic Exhibition of ‘Tacky Red Cameras’

Last week during a cold February evening in the Borders of Scotland, the lights of a small photographic art gallery were turned on for the first time and a new exhibition was unveiled. The walls were devoid of landscapes, portraits and the traditional visual art you’d come to expect with photographers. Instead a large, garish print hung on the far wall, unmistakably red. A small sign to the left gave it the name ‘Tacky Red Cameras.’

Tacky Red Cameras, Photographic Print - Sam Cornwell 2015.
Tacky Red Cameras, Photographic Print – Sam Cornwell 2015.

We’ve got used to seeing camera collections in many different shapes and forms, especially ones with high price tags on eBay. What makes this collection different from all those is the overwhelming abundance of the colour red. Upon further inspection, The Becher-esque style grid is filled with 81 (9×9) individually coloured red cameras.

Tacky Red Cameras Photographic Print, 70x70", Dibond.
Tacky Red Cameras Photographic Print, 70×70″, Dibond.

Tacky Red Cameras is a five year long study into mass production practises of the 20th century and how we have continued to consume in the present and beyond. A seemingly unobvious collection of red cameras all of which are still in their purchased, second hand state take place in three forms; a sculpture, a photographic print and a 3D printed object. The past, present and future.

The large print fills the white wall it is homed on and is big enough for the viewer to get up close and personal to inspect the different models on display. The actual cameras in sculpture form are presented beautifully encased in clear tubes close to the print.

Tacky Red Cameras, Sculpture – Sam Cornwell 2015.

The trifecta is completed with a much smaller exhibit, also unashamedly red. Artist Sam Cornwell collaborated with French artist Quentin Orhant to print a red camera. Yes, print. Continue reading

Artists Brings old Cameras back to Life as Anthropormorphic Sculptures

In a twist that may inspire millions to reach for their attic cupboards and pull out boxes of old camera gear, Michael Vivona shows that film photography isn’t dead just yet by bringing analogue cameras back to life.

Michael Vivona Camera Statue or Johnny 5 is still alive?
Michael Vivona Camera Statue or Johnny 5 is still alive?

Michael openly admits that he isn’t a photographer, which is evident from the Instagram filtered display photos he’s taken for his art. However, what he lacks in compositional detail for the camera frame, he more than makes up for in his artistic ability as a sculptor. And it’s not just your typical Hollywood shape that’s appearing in his collection, there’s a penchant for dogs as well.

Woof woof, whirrr, click.
Woof woof, whirrr, click.

Drawn to items built and designed in the ‘Atomic Age’ Michael poured through local thrift stores looking for items when he stumbled across his first ‘camerabot.’ With a projector as a body, security cameras as feet and an old twin lens reflex 120 film camera lending itself as eyes, his first Wall-E or Johnny-5 type character was born. Continue reading