This Review of a Canon 300D is Everything Wrong with the Camera Industry

UPDATE: Chris Niccolls has been in touch with Phogotraphy. Niccolls says the scene the the end of the video was not faked as stated elsewhere. Niccolls now says the drowned 300D will be used as a prop in further videos.

Phogotraphy maintains that the stunt at the end of the video, wether it was intended to mislead or not combined with saying the camera has no use is a bad example to set to future camera owning generations.


I want to talk to you about a mediocre video that’s currently blowing up on the Photography subreddit at the moment. It’s not particularly funny and despite its promise, interesting either. The premise is sound enough; review an old DSLR by comparing it with a modern equivalent. It’s something most photographers could do without picking the thing up, but I stomached the whole 12 minutes to see what transpired.

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Chris Nicholls comes across genuine enough and once you can get over the fact he sounds exactly like Owen Wilson (isms et al) his candid review of a working Canon 300D Continue reading

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Malfunctioning Scanner Creates Beautiful Glitch Art

Perfection is so 2007. Unless you’re still stuck in the ever turning escalator of commercialism you’ll have noticed these days imperfections are very much in vogue. So when ultra-hip blog ‘The Rescued Film Project’ started experiencing technical glitches with their scanner, it was like churning out instant art.

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In what looks like a malfunction capturing the higher end of the dynamic range in each scan, the near to over exposed objects have been replaced Continue reading

Architects Designed this Building to look like a Computer Glitch

If you often work with digital photography, this building may look strangely familiar and create a stirring annoyance in your waters. The architect has intentionally designed it to look like a typical image file glitch. Look a bit closer.

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The brainchild of Christoph Merian Stiftung, the piece was commissioned by the House of Electronic Arts Basel and now sits prominently on display Continue reading

The Camera Phone: A Little Empathy Making Machine

Yesterday evening I was lucky enough to catch the tail end of BBC Radio 4’s Four Thought featuring Charles Leadbeater, British author of We Think and former political advisor to Tony Blair. The episode on a whole addressed the struggle we all have with ‘The Whirlpool Economy’ and how we can come to terms with working longer hours and achieving less.

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Image by Madmoo / Fiverr

Towards the end of the monologue Leadbeater uses an analogy we are all very familiar with by now and relates the ubiquitous use of camera phones to the devaluation of photography as a whole. However somewhat refreshingly he flips the thought on its head and ends up calling the camera phone “A little empathy making machine.” Continue reading

Professor Puppet Explains Depth of Field.

The scene is set, the voluptuous female lead makes her entrance and all but confesses her husband’s murder. Then out of absolutely nowhere Professor Hans Von Puppet interrupts the femme fatale scene to explain depth of field.

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In this wonderfully put together ‘Pocket Film School’ web series by Mark W. Gray’s alter ego Professor Puppet goes to great lengths in explaining different techniques and cinematic phrases that we’d otherwise be clueless about. In the short film below we’re treated to an array of samples and how to make the most of our cameras using different aperture settings. That and the Professor’s trademark humour.

It even touches on how focal length is affected by sensor and film sizes as an added bonus, which even some of the more seasoned photographers have troubles realising (though they’d never admit it.)

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If you enjoyed that video we urge you to sign up to Professor Puppet’s Youtube channel and look out for more of his Pocket Film School.


Incidentally if you want to commission Professor Puppet for one of your own videos, you can do so here on Fiverr.

12 Reasons Photographers Choose to Shoot Digital Instead of Film.

Since posting the original article 12 Reasons Photographers Choose to Shoot Film over Digital an intense amount of vitriol has been directed towards it, which is not surprising considering how divisive the dichotomy can be.

It’s mostly been by people who can’t read properly and are therefore already at a disadvantage, however to be completely fair we’re going to flip things on their head and take a look at reasons why a photographer would choose to shoot digital instead of film.

The perfect Kodak moment now only comes in digital.
The perfect Kodak moment now only comes in digital.

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12 Reasons Photographers Still Choose to Shoot Film over Digital

This year will mark forty years since the invention of the first functioning digital camera, and despite it being a measly 0.01 Mp it heralded a new age of digital photography and with it came a death cry for film.

Yup, film is still very much in use by photographers.
Yup, film is still very much in use by photographers. (Click for an Amazon Link)

Prompted by this incredibly dull article published recently by the BBC I decided to ask some fellow photographers what reasons they had for still shooting the so-called outdated technology. Here’s the list…

1. Film Photography was Already Perfect.

Those of us lucky enough to have photo albums from the ’90s and before tucked away in our parents’ homes will undoubtedly take great joy in flicking through the tattered card pages, looking through the embarrassing portraits, day trips to the zoo, the beach, birthday parties and that time our trousers fell down in the park. The point I’m making is these vernacular photo albums were perfect and they were all shot on film.

Even old Photo Albums Found at Junkyard Sales have that Perfect Photographer's Touch
Even old Photo Albums Found at Junkyard Sales have that Perfect Photographer’s Touch

Fast forward to today and we’re not only making fewer albums, we’re taking more photographs to get that perfect shot. Even our smartphones are littered with countless portraits of our children, nieces and nephews, because the photo before could have been just a little bit better. Back in the day of film photography we didn’t worry about that and those photo albums that we look back on are still as perfect today as when our parents first stuck them down.

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Now a Computer Algorithm turns your Photographs into Poetry

This morning I stumbled on to the wonderfully engineered Word.Camera website via a PetaPixel blog post. The premise is simple: Convert a jpeg into somewhat meaningful English language.

To test it out I uploaded this small jpeg of my son on top of an abandoned building, silhouetted by the Sun.

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I gave the computer an unusual image with plenty of contrast to decipher.

It took the algorithm a few minutes to process an answer. Finally I was presented with several paragraphs of text giving a better than vague description of the image it received:

Of course, a barbed wire, a men, and an energy. Thus, the barbed wire remains unknown. The men evokes typing, and the energy is made from an enterprising or ambitious drive. Probably, the barbed wire remains unknown.

…Yet, a silhouette and a sunset: the silhouette evokes outlining, and the sunset is not the time in the evening at which the sun beginning to fall below the horizon.

Ok, it’s a little jumbled, but understandable English for anyone who has at least a slim grasp on the language. The prose has a familiar air of poetry about it and perhaps with a little human refinement could even be passed off as professional.

I spoke to David Phillips, who operated a poem a day blog in 2014 to ask his thoughts on how the computer algorithm could shake up the industry. Continue reading

Just Don’t Point this Camera at the Police

Moscow based artist Dmitry Morozov has designed a digital camera by reengineering a Gameboy classic, accompanying thermal printer accessory and a GUN!

Dmitry Morozov's 8-bit Instant Photo Gun.
Dmitry Morozov’s 8-bit Instant Photo Gun.

He calls it the 8-bit Instant Photo Gun, and that’s exactly what it is. Despite looking like a movie prop from a futuristic steampunk-esque film like Mad Max, the camera is actually quite functional. Albeit a certain taste may be required to appreciate this certain output aesthetic.

The thermal printers & camera were sold as an accessory to the Gameboy over a decade ago. With under 1 Mega-Pixel of power they are slowly starting to creep bag into the digital-hispter’s bag. Morozov has simply repurposed the entire system to work with a gun’s trigger. Continue reading